Snapshot: Greenbenchramblings

Malcolm Mollart is the author of a long-running garden blog Greenbenchramblings which is inspired by the garden he created with his wife, Jude, in the South Shropshire Hills. In June of this year, Malcom paid us a visit and took plenty of photographs whilst he was at it. We asked him to select some of his favourites, tell us about his own passion for horticulture and pick out those bits of Winterbourne which made the greatest impression.

Agapanthus and Eucomis, photograph by Malcolm Mollart, Winterbourne House and Garden, Digging for Dirt
Agapanthus and Eucomis, photograph by Malcolm Mollart

“I am a 65-year-old retired head teacher, who had to retire early due to disability. I have now spent more years in retirement than working, so have had the luxury of time to develop my gardening skills and ideas. My love of gardening comes from my Father who loved his cottage style garden and was well-known locally for his roses.”

Edgbaston Pool, photograph by Malcolm Mollart, Winterbourne House and Garden, Digging for Dirt
Edgbaston Pool, photograph by Malcolm Mollart

“Our garden is just under a quarter of an acre and is best described as a modern cottage garden with added quirky features. We have been gardening this patch for 13 years and started out with a completely blank canvas. We enjoy integrating sculpture into our garden and we are particularly passionate about gardening with wildlife and creating a calm atmosphere and a place of contentment.”

Bracken, photograph by Malcolm Mollart, Winterbourne House and Garden, Digging for Dirt
Bracken, photograph by Malcolm Mollart

“We found out about Winterbourne when we picked up a leaflet several years ago and it had been on our bucket list for quite a while before we visited this year. We loved the idea of a beautiful garden situated in the middle of a city. When we visited we loved this juxtaposition.”

Kitchen Garden, photograph by Malcolm Mollart, Winterbourne House and Garden, Digging for Dirt
Kitchen Garden, photograph by Malcolm Mollart

“We found a beautiful climber we had never seen before called Actinidia arguta and a design element new to us was the raised bed displaying a selection of succulents. We were inspired by the warm welcome created by the little cameo plantings and plantings in unusual containers that made us feel so good as soon as we entered the garden. This is something we intend to develop further in our own patch.”

Arid House and Succulent Bed, photograph by Malcolm Mollart, Winterbourne House and Garden, Digging for Dirt
Arid House and Succulent Bed, photograph by Malcolm Mollart

“We loved the way that the gardens have been created to give different atmospheres and varying garden elements such as the bog and water garden, the succulent area and the woodland walks. Although separate entities they work as a cohesive unit.”

Japanese Bridge and Woodland Walk, photograph by Malcolm Mollart, Winterbourne House and Garden, Digging for Dirt
Japanese Bridge and Woodland Walk, photograph by Malcolm Mollart

“My blog, Greenbenchramblings, is all about gardens, gardening, wildlife and all things creative. I have been writing it now for 5 years having started it on my 60th birthday as a new challenge. I think gardeners love visiting other gardens and sharing their own because they are part of a community of like-minded individuals with a love of plants and the special ways they are used in gardens. I love the camaraderie evident in our own garden when we open to groups or on our open days. I like to see our patch through the eyes of others.”

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9 thoughts on “Snapshot: Greenbenchramblings

  1. Love this post! It’s just how I feel when I explore a new garden, looking for new ideas and structures, and learning about new plants. My favourite photo is the Japanese bridge, as it’s so serene.

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  2. “Through the eyes of others.” That’s the whole of it, isn’t it? To develop — and share — that “place of contentment” is at the heart of gardening, it seems to me. A lovely commentary, beautiful images. Thank you.

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    1. Hello Maureen. Malcolm’s observation about the pleasure of seeing a garden through the eyes of others was spot on! It is really illuminating to see the garden from the perspective of another. With that in mind – don’t forget to remember us if you ever visit Birmingham!

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